#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: Bainimarama attacks Commonwealth, silent on assasination plot

Friday, March 12, 2010

Bainimarama attacks Commonwealth, silent on assasination plot

Pacific Beat, March 11 2010: Fiji's Military backed leader Commodre Frank Bainimarama has repeated his threat to drop Commonwealth membership, if the group of nations continues to question his plans for the island nation's future. Commodore Bainimarama first made the threat last month, saying that if the Commonwealth did not decide to help Fiji, then his Government had no use for it. Speaking on radio in New Zealand, the Commodore was happy to take aim at the Commonwealth, but avoided talking about the recent trial and sentencing of eight men found guilty of plotting his assassination.
Presenter: Campbell Cooney
Speakers: Commodore Frank Bainimarama, Fiji's interim Prime Minister; Peter Willams QC, New Zealand lawyer

COONEY: In 2008 Ballu Khan and his legal team were able to get a permanent stay of proceedings against him granted in relation to the alleged assassination plot, and after that he left Fiji for New Zealand. But repeatedly during the recent trial of the remaining eight men, Fiji High Court Judge Justice Paul Madigan made it clear he believed Mr Khan was the assassination plot ringleader, and that led Fiji�s Department of Prosecutions to tell local reporters they were looking at what could be done. So far there�s been no confirmation if a decision has been made. Speaking on New Zealand Indo Fijian radio station, Radio Tarana this week, Ballu Khan was a topic Commodore Bainimarama was avoiding.

BAINIMARAMA: (inaudible) information between his office will be (inaudible) The last thing we want is for anyone to start speculating which in turn will cause confusion.

COONEY: Ballu Khan�s legal representative, New Zealand QC Peter Williams told Geraldine Coutts his client had nothing to answer for.

WILLIAMS: How can you extradite anybody who�s been acquitted? So that�s just propaganda. Anyway how could they extradite? They haven�t got a legal government over there, and there�s no merit in their evidence anyway. Of course there are a lot of rumours about the veracity of this last trial over there as well, and the way that the assessors were selected and whether or not the person who selected the assessors was in fact a member of the military. But I understand that they�ve demanded a blanket to be placed over all that information.

COONEY: Over the past 12 months New Zealand�s Radio Tarana has often been the way Fiji�s military regime has tried to reach the large expatriate Fijian community there. And while this time Commodore Bainimarama was avoiding talking about Ballu Khan, he was more forthcoming about the Commonwealth. Last month he told local media in Fiji if the Commonwealth continues to meddle in his regime�s attempts to move Fiji forward, in particular repeatedly demanding a return to democracy, then Fiji would drop its membership. When asked about this, his reply made use of the nation building language, including a call for understanding from the international community, which Commodore Bainimarama often uses when he talks to international media and international events. In public relations talk, he was staying on message.

BAINIMARAMA: It is focused on achieving its goals as contained in the roadmap to democracy and sustainable socio-economic development. This is the path of reform and modernisation that we have now taken and which we will pursue until we achieve our stated intentions. We are more confident of what we want now and the organising strategies we are currently implementing are meant to help achieve our goals for our people now and in the future.

COONEY: But that didn�t mean his threat of dropping Commonwealth membership was left out.

BAINIMARAMA: My invitation for the international community to consider the issue from Fiji�s perspective in this case. That�s all we ask of them and to choose otherwise, then our choice will be whether to leave the Commonwealth or not. It�s obvious.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Can't for the life of me figure out why he's so upset?

Threat of assassination comes with the territory - part & parcel of being a dictator.

Jon said...

Military Legalises Homosexuality and Outlaws Heterosexuality

Suva – Friday 12 March
In a surprise move this morning, the Fiji Military Forces token Indian, Brigadier General Aziz sacked several officers for having heterosexual sex with colleagues. Colonel Aziz referred to the recent Legalisation of Homosexuality decree and advised that should any more FMF personnel be found discharging dishonourably into female members of the opposite sex, they would be dishonourably discharged from the FMF.

“The military put the Homosexual decree in place for a reason and we are honour bound to adhere to it,” Colonel Aziz continued, “Colonel Driti spelt it out the other day when he said that the military and civil society march to the sound of a different drum.”

Staying on message, this afternoon Commodore Bainimarama declared himself Queen of Fiji and carried out his longstanding threat to suspend the United Kingdom’s membership of the Commonwealth of the Fiji Islands. Bainimarama took the dramatic step of removing Elizabeth Windsor’s portrait from his office wall in order to make room for another photo of himself dressed in a smart pinstripe suit addressing several sleeping delegates at the United Nations.

When interviewed, Mr Bainimarama stated, “She wasn’t elected into power. Nepotism got her the throne. And she’s got the bloody cheek to sit there and lecture me on democracy and one man, one vote? The bloody hypocrite.”

Mrs Windsor replied that she didn’t find it very funny. “Great granny gave me that speck of pelican dropping in the middle of the ocean. What? Oh, Nauru, is it? Sorry. Still, I find it a bit rich that this chap comes along just as we find oil there and tries to… What’s that? The Falklands? Oh, how interesting. You can’t blame me though, he does dress like Galtieri, doesn’t he? Why doesn’t he start wearing a skirt again? Sulu, you say? H’mmm.”