#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: IMF statement after its two-week visit

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Friday, April 23, 2010

IMF statement after its two-week visit

Coverage of the end of the two-week visit by the IMF delegation has been a bit mixed.
Jonathan Dunn's delegation issued its statement yesterday and some of today's headlines had different takes on the success of the visit.

The Fiji Live headline was 'Sustainable policies needed: IMF'.
The Fiji Sun headline was: 'We'll stand by Fiji, International Monetary Fund says'.

Below is the relevant part of the IMF statement for you to make your own conclusions:

“The authorities and the mission agreed that the policies should be set so as to put Fiji on the path to sustainable and broad-based growth. We will continue to discuss policy measures required to ensure fiscal sustainability and specific structural reforms to underpin Fiji’s medium-term growth while protecting the vulnerable. We welcome the authorities’ intention to approach donors for support for key structural reforms of public enterprises and the civil service.

“The mission greatly appreciated the authorities’ openness and the frank discussions of the economic challenges faced by Fiji. The IMF looks forward to the possibility of making further progress toward these ends in the coming months that would ensure external stability and help catalyze donor support for Fiji’s reform efforts.”

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Crucial word being 'donor'- USA.

This will be very interesting?

P'fika observer said...

So is the IMF talking to donors on behalf of Fiji or is it trying to pass Fiji on to donors because it doesn't want to shell out any money?

If it was right behind Fiji as the Fiji Sun says shurely it would've given money already?

Anonymous said...

No way can the IMF(US)justify extending this regime credit (funds).

They more than most should realise you can't appease or show support for a despot dictatorship that forcibly overthrew a democraticly elected goverment.

where are the ships of gold? said...

Like the so called ships of gold from china and india - all bulls....t! Just group think propaganda from an increasingly desperate military junta. Fiji is going backwards at a fast rate - the whole world knows this.
Those who pretend to believe the rubbish are the coup perpetrators and their sad old emotional glee club supporters like crosbie walsh - a senile old loser living in the past!

Anonymous said...

The region is actually doing quite well thanks to fiji going backwards...we always get the brain drain and he capital we locals sell up, you can't get decent doctors nurses or anyone with reasonable skills and your graduates have some of the highest unemployment rates in the region...keep it up...coz no-one is coming to your aid anytime soon...and your only friends appears to be china, zimbabwe, burma, iran and north korea...who given the opportunity will smile for the photo's and whilst raping you from behind and telling you that things are much better than in the 'west' and their funny ideas about liberty, justice and parliamentary democracy.

Anonymous said...

These kinds of comments by the IMF are a big concern. One of the major vulnerabilities that Fiji is facing with an illegal regime in place, is what the military government will agree to in order to get funds/standing with international financial institutions. This puts us right on the chopping block for painful structural adjustment programmes (now renamed Poverty Reduction Strategies [PRSs]), similar to what we experienced in the 1990s under Rabuka. These types of economic measures will just exacerbate unemployment and hurt the most marginalised. Another example is the opening up of deepsea mining to foreign investors, which also comes with serious environmental consequences. All these decisions are passing unquestioned because dissent is not permitted in Fiji at the moment - and as just one result, we are beign locked in to serious and potentially hazardous national decisions on the economy and the environment.