#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: Missing link in missing million

Sunday, September 19, 2010

Missing link in missing million

We now know who bought the Fiji Times but we're none the wiser over one of the more bizzare stories of recent weeks - the missing million dollars.

The facts have become so distorted, it's anybody's guess what the real yarn is.

Fiji police have turned to the international police criminal organisation, Interpol, but there are so many discrepancies, even Hercule Poirot would get twitchy.  

Different media, overseas and Fiji based, have revealed contradictory information, with some news agencies saying just a few days ago that $20,000 of the money has been recovered.

Then there are the reports the container the money was in, was worth $200 million, suggesting much, much more than a million dollars was stolen.

It's now also being widely reported the shipment was tampered with on the way to Fiji from the United Kingdom, not in Suva as first thought and orignally reported.

All the "facts" seemingly point to a crime committed offshore, and not on the watch of a local or involving locals in any way, as originally touted.

Is this a smokescreen? And will Interpol buy it? 

Certainly, the Fiji Reserve Bank needs to front up after last week encouraging banks to take the newly minted missing $20 that surface.

The bank's decision prompted the Fiji Employers Federation to issue an advisory saying accepting the money would "prevent any payment disruptions that may occur by not giving good value and avoid the risk of undermining the integrity and confidence in currency."

That's either a very strategic central bank move or it knows the money is coming from a "bona fide" source. Why else would it urge banks and businesses to accept the money without fuss?

As we came to see with the recent sale of the Fiji Times after weeks of smokescreens, the truth will eventually out. And so it will, with the missing million or millions.

If the new police commissioner, Brigadier General Ioane Naivalurua (pictured above), can ever find someone to succeed him as Commissioner of Prisons, perhaps he can lead from the front.

He might want to start with regime and military circles, where the truth might be closer to home than realised. 


Cages need to be rattled on this one.

11 comments:

  1. Something very funny here?

    Kept a copy of the Fiji Sun article quoting Reserve Bank guy uneqivocally stating the container was valued at "$200m".

    Strange how such a major and interesting story such as this has mysteriously disappeared from mainstream Suva media? (papers).

    ReplyDelete
  2. They best check under Sada Reddy's mattress, Bocimarama's backyard and the rest of the 'CONGOS' involved in this regime! What is more strange there hardly is ANY NEWS in the local papers about this heist! How much more will they rape this country!!???
    'Fiji o Fiji I cry with thee...'
    This should be our new national anthem!!! lol

    ReplyDelete
  3. The most talked about theory on the street is that the military regime (army and navy) themselves committed the heist so as the money could go into circulation quickly with out the beauracratic processes necessary to legitimise the money and keep track of it.

    Then when RBF said to accept the money, future stats in a couple of months will say "consumer spending is up" and therefore the economy is still all rosy.

    The regime thinks that by doing it this way, they can fool investors into parting with their money into such an amazing bloomin' economy.

    Clowns. Liars. Fools. Despots.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The new polcom is another outright beneficiary of this idiotic coup so we cannot expect anything that will uncover the truth of the matter. He was appointed to safeguard the guilty ones - him being one of them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Its funny how things work out in the end, confirming so called rumours speculated by blog sites. Not too long ago it was speculated that Naivalurua was going to be the next Commissioner of Police and that there was problem between Tele Tuby and the Vore.

    This was denied by government but when the public were not looking Tele Tubby was silently forced to resign. And while there was some degree of relief in the acting appointment of a career police officer; there was suprise at the appointment of the Yellow Ribbon Boss.

    So the blog sites got it right long time ago but Vore was playing a waiting game to disguise any rift amongst honourable council of thieves at Nabua

    ReplyDelete
  6. Tadu@11.52. What a great theory. The advisory from the government is odd one must say so you gotta wonder why the Federal Bank would encourage businesses and banks to allow stolen and undocumented money into the Fiji economy, when it was supposedly stolen. Most countries do the opposite. As suggested by thhis story, it looks like the regime is drip feeding (????) or flooding the economy with money. The only weakness is the theory is why would they allow the interpol to get involved.

    ReplyDelete
  7. @Tiger Balm .. vinaka tau --- the answer to your question as to why they would release information (via censors) to SAY that Interpol is involved ... is so that :

    a) You - the taxpayer - can believe the story that someone else done it and feel some "relief" that something is done about it (whereas in fact Interpol is not involved)

    b) The English Mint and the IMF , and the UN and whoever other world authorities there are that need to care about this , can feel "relief" that Interpol has been involved (whereas in fact Interpol is not involved)

    c) ... and finally to create the myth that Interpol is involved so that local suspicions via coconut wireless dont go viral, and start pointing the finger back the original troublemakers - ie Baiyass.

    But I fear it is a bit late for that.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Can't make head nor tale of this?

    Bank guy claims container valued at $200m - all in newly printed $20
    notes. Early reports claim eitheir $1m - or 200K (take your pick?)is currently in circulation.

    So where's the rest?

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a joke, involve the interpol for the missing million. What about the missing millions from NBF? Why not recover that first from the current cabinet ministers at least.

    ReplyDelete
  10. @ Tadu and Tiger Balm, if the Interpol is involved than this will be the illegal gov biggest mistake cause Interpol will get to the bottom of this and they will reveal all those involved, infact they will not be intimidated by these goons, this is a different kettle of fish they will be dealing with.
    The last I heard was that the police had said that the monies were stolen overseas, in Singapore to be exact. What is so funny is what the RBF said, what the market vendors were saying and how in the world did the money turn up the very next day....with 20,000.00 already recovered, wow. Sa rauta mada na lasu ra yavu macawa levu.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Jeke .... I can tell you from first hand information, that Interpol is NOT involved because at least the regime know it WAS an inside job.

    It is yet another big lie.

    The problem with lies is that you have to spin so fast and like cake layers you have to pile lie on after lie, AND you have to remember what the first lie was. And because the regime is so disjointed this will come apart very fast.

    ReplyDelete

Please verify to prove you're not a robot.