#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: Tanzania clamps down on Chinese traders - lesson for Fiji?

Monday, January 10, 2011

Tanzania clamps down on Chinese traders - lesson for Fiji?

Traders in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
MARKET FORCES: Locals protected from Chinese traders.


Chinese traders in Tanzania's main city of Dar es Salaam have been give 30 days to stop trading in a busy market.

The deputy industry minister says Chinese businessmen are allowed into the country as investors, but not as "vendors or shoe-shiners". 

Lazaro Nyalandu says these jobs could "be carried out by locals", Tanzania's Citizen paper quotes him as saying.

A BBC reporter says there are many foreigners trading illegally in Tanzania, especially from China.

They have opened up many small retail and wholesale shops, the BBC's Hassan Mhelela in Dar es Salaam says.

But the Chinese traders are sometimes resented for their business acumen, he says. Mr Nyalandu made the comments at Kariakoo market, which the government wants to become an export centre for the East African nation.

He also said Tanzania was about to do a deal with the Chinese government to ensure that goods imported from China meet international standards, Tanzania's Guardian newspaper reports. (The BBC homepage)

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don’t have anything against the Chinese on a personal level. The problem with the Chinese business practice is that they will avoid paying their dues whenever possible. You go to any Chinese shop in Fiji and buy anything you will almost never get a receipt. Not issuing a receipt means that they can avoid declaring the income and thus not pay all the relevant taxes. They also have a language advantage when buying from China (everything now is made in China) and hence they reduce values on imported items avoiding duty and other charges. I was speaking to a customs officer who told me that a store owner in Fiji imported 7000 watches. The declared value was $0.18 each. The watches did not look that cheap and i know for a fact that things are cheap in China but not that cheap. Customs had to clear the items simply because they had no means of verification to prove otherwise. The Chinese have an unfair advantage and they seem to get away with the "me no speakee English BS". The new group of Chinese coming into Fiji contribute very little socially to our society. They keep to themselves and seem hell bent on just making money. What bothers me though is how do they get the permits to start up retail stores and eateries when other investors have to invest a minimum amount in Fiji which certainly is much more then what setting up a retail store or a restaurant in Fiji would cost.

Anonymous said...

RATU SAID.
FIJI WILL BE NEXT UAGANDA OR CHINA.
WE HAVE HEAPS OF CHINA COMPANIES AND MALAYSIAN COMING TO FIJI.
LETS WE FORGET MBF MALAYSIA MASTER CARD HELPED CLOSED NBF BANK.
WE WILL HAVE DRUGS/GUNS ON THE STREET OF FIJI.