#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: Forum soft cocks end 2013 visit to Suva

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Saturday, April 13, 2013

Forum soft cocks end 2013 visit to Suva

Murray McCully wraps up another unexceptional visit to Fiji. With him are Forum secretary general Tuiloma Neroni Slade at left and Tuisugaletaua Ali’imalemanu Sofara Aveau, a Samoan government minister, at right.


As expected the latest Contact Ministerial visit to Suva has yielded a lame noting of the illegal government failing to stick to the agreed to 'road map' but little else.

And just like the last one, this lot here is pinning all hope on the promised 2014 election to usher in a return to democracy.

As the Americans say: someone has drunk the Kool Aid. 

We publish the excerpts from its statement but note the absence and denunciation of the burning of the Constitutional drafts that had been prepared with the input of citizens, the regime's decision to impose its own Constitution on citizens and the introduction of the political parties decree. 

We've published it as a matter of record not because it has merit. The Forum might want to check out the Al Jazeera interview that confirms what blogs have been reporting for some time, that the reform process is a sham.



Something with more bite also is the video, The Power of Laughtivism: Srjda Popovism, which was spotted by fellow blogger Shazzer and Grubby this week. See it at end of story.


CMAG statement
Ministers noted the progress that Fiji had made in 2012 towards elections, including the extensive consultation and work of the independent Constitution Commission, which had generated a level of popular engagement and interest which was unprecedented since 2006. In that context, Ministers expressed concerns about departures from Fiji’s previously announced Roadmap process and emphasised the need for a constitution building process that enjoyed the support of the people of Fiji and the respect of the international community.

Ministers recalled assurances from the Fiji Interim Government at the time of the last MCG visit to Fiji in May 2012, including that elections would be held no later than September 2014, that there would be no media restrictions in relation to the constitutional consultation process and that elections would be free and fair. Ministers were pleased to have the commitment reiterated in today’s meeting.

Ministers noted the expectations of the people of Fiji and the international community for free and fair elections should be achieved through:

A final version of the new constitution that credibly takes public views into account;
An independent elections oversight mechanism (Supervisor/Commission) established without further delay;
Free and fair participation by political parties in the electoral process commencing with fair and timely registration
Independent election monitoring;
Freedom of expression, media and assembly in the lead up to the election and beyond;
And a general acceptance of the election outcome by the people of Fiji.

Ministers emphasised the need for citizens and political parties to be able to nominate for elections, meet freely, campaign openly and to participate without hindrance in the political process and public debate.

Ministers noted that the decision to extend the consultation period for the draft constitution and the announcement that permits were not required for political meetings to discuss the draft constitution were welcome recent steps, and indicative of the sorts of actions which would be watched closely by the Forum and the international community when measuring progress towards a restoration of democracy in Fiji.

Ministers reaffirmed Forum Leaders’ willingness to support Fiji’s return to democracy, including through assistance with elections, provided that the Forum could be satisfied that genuine progress was being made.

As requested by Forum Leaders, the MCG will provide a report to Forum Leaders in advance of the Forum Leaders Meeting in Majuro in September on the situation in Fiji, noting the Fiji Interim Government’s commitment to elections in 2014 and the positive steps taken, and the further steps required to ensure a credible democratic outcome in September 2014, if not earlier.

Ministers reaffirmed the Forum’s intention to remain engaged with Fiji and their desire to continue a constructive dialogue with Fiji in the lead-up to elections.

Al Jazeera interview with Fiji's 2006 coup leader
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezc5LpEH_UM&feature=youtu.be


Democracy send up by comedian Srdja Popovic


59 comments:

Anonymous said...

very limp cock. no gut. no penetration. very superficial poke.
but no surprises. 6 years later we know how useless these cocks are.

Kamlesh Kumar said...

Heh heh heh. egg on the face of anti Baini supporters. What ever Baini is doing is right for the people of Fiji. Even the forum leaders couldn't fault or see any thing wrong Baini has been doing.

Anonymous said...

No egg is on the face of Murray McCully and his government. Anti regime supporters have never been blind to Frank Bainimarama and saw ministerial visits for what they were ages ago.

Anonymous said...

Why would we want to believe these
forum group? THEY'VE been here before the Biketewa Accords is already in existence.So why do you have to continously come back to talk to this illegal Regime?You've already witness Bainimarama bullshit?The man is a disaster,so
activate the Biketewa accord and take out these bastards.

Anonymous said...

It's possible the Forum sees more than they saying.

Anonymous said...

It's possible the Forum is seeing through it's arsehole.That's why it is not seeing all that much!

Anonymous said...

you guys on here are critisising everybody who is in support of this government.This government is doing above everybody's expectations.The majority of the Fijian people do support it and it's the only way forward for the country as a whole.
A great job done by the Govt.Keep up the good work.

Long Live Bainimarama
Long Live ASK
Long Live FMF

Dharam Lingam

Anonymous said...

a picture can tell you a lot.and when you look at the three monkeys in the photo above you know they don't have a clue what is happening in Fiji. they should just eat their bananas and bugger off.

Anonymous said...

Coka..says

for people who are saying this military govt is good:
can they explain why bainimarama is seen 1. in navy uniform..2 in land force commander uniform...as president of fru uniform..as PM uniform..as a fuckaround uniform..in indian uniform..in muslim uniform..in vere vaka bau uniform...na cava mada e caka i ba tiko on sona vuce..de coat of many colours...sa voleka ga me dara mai na sulu ni pope..nona saga tiko me kawai taki koya na tamata...sega ni kila tiko o koya..o ira na sotia makaraka toka o koya e na dua siga kati koya tale..ya ni susuga tiko na gata...o ira na sotia me rawa tiko nodra kucu, nodra garo, nodra viavialevu..nodra bula..ra tokona koya tiko kina..da dabe kei ira na sotia e na gunu yaqona da qai raica na viavialevu sa mai vakavuna tu na coup sonasona qo..ia na gauna sana suka lesu tale kina na matanitu..me kua sara ga ni lomani..me ra kau kece i makogai se na otioti ni yanu2 i viti me ra lai vesu kece tu kina se mera baca kece ni ika..kera tiko i vanua ia mera kana kuita tiko yaco ni ra veka..mi..ya mera tinia kina vakadua na viavia levu sara cakava tu..o ra tou na lala nei khaiyum...mera vesu kece na yalewa turaga ni lewa..ka mera vakabukete taki tiko vei yabakai yacova ni e sucu tini na gone...ia me ra ca buka..me ra bula tale ga va nakoro..o ratou Khaiyum ..me vakau sara ga yani idia se vei na
vanua e ra vu mai kina..ke sega me ratou kau i vanua balavu me ratou lai tea tiko na kena uvi o qarase yacova nona mate..ya o khaiyum kei na nona matavuvale, o ira na tacina tukadra, luvena kei nona kawa..me ra tei tei, qoli, ta niu kei tataviraki e na koro o mavana..me ratou tiko vaka vesu mai tota..

o ira na sotia..me kau kece na e ragi me lai vakamai , se volitaki me saumi kina nodra i curucuru na gone viti i usp se na koro ni vuli cava ra via vuli kina..o ira na turaga ni valu...me ra kau me ni dau ni tomi benu e na gauna caka kina na koniferedi se me dau samaka na gauni sala , sala ni wai kei sala ni waini da e lomani koro turaga kei na vei taoni lalai.. o ratou na wati pm..o mary kei o ratou na luvena yalewa..me ratou kau me liga ni se boro vei roko tui dreketi..me ratou dau sava2 ni nona kuro yacova ni ratou mate...AU NA TAUCA TIKO YANI NA TOTOGI >>YA NA KA SA LEWA O COKA>>>

I HAVE THE NUMBERS said...

kranky franky says he has received 500,000 submissions for his constitution compared to 7,000 for ghais.
they must have been all txt messages from vodafone,'just watch, by next week he will have 1.5million submissions, more than twice the number of men women and childre born and yet to be born...LOL.'
what a Joke.
He doesnt say whether they support him or not.
This guy is not just a lying dictator, hes a circus clown.

Anonymous said...

President Obama pls sent the same statement to Frank/Khaiyum .
Dictators of the world time to go.
Fiji can be freed from this taliban khaiyum/frank the cranky.

Hmmm..... said...

The late Margaret Thatcher had once famously said:

"If you want something said, ask a man. If you want something done, ask a woman."


Nuff said. :)

Anonymous said...

Love Popovic! He's a kindred spirit. He brought to mind a brilliant compendium that I have which is entitled "Small Acts of Resistance" by Steve Crawshaw and John Jackson (2010).

As the name suggest, its a compilation of about 80-odd stories from around the globe - from Serbia to Sudan, Afghanistan to Zimababwe on non-violent acts of resistance, act of bold defiance and acts of witty disobediance (as we see with the Shazzer Grubby love diary). You'll have nothing but the greatest of respect for ordinary, defenceless human beings in similar situations (or worse) as we have here in Fiji whose small acts of courage will bring you laughter and tears simultaneously - the formidable human spirit in the face of open evil and aggression.

God Bless Fiji.

Anonymous said...

Link up..

http://www.smallactsofresistance.com/

https://www.facebook.com/smallactsofresistance

God Bless Fiji.

Anonymous said...

Four stories from Small Acts of Resistance from Poland, Burma, Uruguay and the UK.


1. High-Fidelity Fast Food

Police in a one-party state have a more or less simple task. If people criticize the government, they are either harassed or arrested. The system is clear-cut and well understood by arresters and arrested alike.

Things get more complicated when citizens become implausibly loyal.

In Poland in the 1980s, after the banning of the independent Solidarity movement, there were countless demonstrations against the Communist regime. Then there was the Orange Alternative—which demonstrated in support of Communism, carrying banners demanding an eight-hour workday for the secret police and showering police cars with flowers.

Everybody knew that such spontaneous support was unthinkable, and understood the pro-Communist sentiment as an unkind joke. It was, however, embarrassing for the regime to admit that aloud.

A “pro-Communist” demonstration on the occasion of the seventieth anniversary of the Russian Revolution in 1987 began with the rousing call, “It is time to break the passivity of the popular masses!” All demonstrators were asked to wear something Communist red: red shoes, red scarf, or at least red lipstick. Those who had nothing red to wear queued up for ketchup-smeared pizza sticks from a nearby fast-food stall, later holding the color-coded food aloft. The police closed the stall down and a customer who asked for ketchup only, never mind the pizza stick, was arrested.

The Orange Alternative also mocked the regime by addressing people’s basic needs. At a 1988 event called “Who’s Afraid of Toilet Paper?” single sheets of toilet paper (which, like so much else, was unavailable in Polish shops at that time) were distributed free to passersby, thus mocking the official shortages. Another event involved the free distribution of sanitary napkins (also unavailable in stores) on International Women’s Day. Again, arrests were made.

That same year, the government finally agreed to talks with Solidarity. Those talks led to contested elections, which had previously seemed unthinkable. Solidarity’s victory in the elections of June 1989 was so overwhelming that the Communists were forced to hand over power. In August, Poland gained the first popularly elected prime minister in the Soviet bloc.

Three months later, not least as a consequence of the defeat of Communism in Poland, the Berlin Wall fell. Illegal ketchup and free toilet paper had each played a part.



2. Of Dogs and Dictators

In September 2007, tens of thousands took to the streets to protest against the lawlessness of the military regime in Burma (officially known as Myanmar). The protests were triggered by a sudden sharp increase in the cost of fuel, but quickly broadened to calls for basic rights and freedoms. The military beat, arrested, and killed protesters. According to the UN, at least thirty-one people died. It became too dangerous to venture onto the streets, which were patrolled by the military. But the imaginative Burmese found a way around that problem: In Rangoon and other cities, they promoted the legions of stray urban dogs to the ranks of protesters.

Dogs are regarded as lowly creatures in Burmese culture. Being reborn as a dog suggests that you were up to no good in a previous life. To hurl a hefty insult in Burmese, throw the word dog or dog’s mother in somewhere, and you won’t go wrong.

Perhaps in an attempt to improve their chances in the next life, stray dogs began to be seen roaming around Rangoon with pictures of the military leader, Than Shwe, and images of other senior leaders tied around their necks.

Throughout the city and to the delight of its residents, troops were seen chasing the protesting mutts down, in a vain attempt to rescue the generals’ irretrievably low esteem. The Irrawaddy, published in neighboring Thailand, quoted a resident as saying with approval: “They seem quite good at avoiding arrest.”

...to be cont'd on next post...

Anonymous said...

*Small acts of resistance stories cont'd...


3. The Great One-Liner

The military junta that ruled Uruguay from 1973 was intolerant in the extreme. Hundreds of thousands fled into exile. Political opponents were jailed. Torture was the order of the day. On occasion, even concerts of classical music were seen as subversive threats. A performance of Ravel’s Piano Concerto for Left Hand was canceled because the title sounded leftishly dangerous. Meanwhile, however, a remarkable small protest took place at soccer games throughout the twelve long years of military rule.

Whenever the band struck up the national anthem before major games, thousands of Uruguayans in the stadium joined in unenthusiastically. This stubborn failure to sing loudly was rebellion enough. But, from the generals’ point of view, there was worse to come. At one point, the anthem declares, Tiranos temblad!—“May tyrants tremble!” Those words served as the cue for the crowds in the stadium suddenly to bellow in unison: “Tiranos temblad!” as they waved their flags. After that brief, excited roar, they continued to mumble their way through to the end of the long anthem.

The authorities could not arrest everyone in the stadium. Nor could they cancel games or drop the singing of the national anthem. The junta toyed with the idea of removing the tiranos temblad! line from public performances of the anthem, but that proved too embarrassing. Why, after all, would the generals remove words from a beloved nineteenth-century hymn, unless they believed that they might be the tyrants in question? Today, the national anthem can be sung at Uruguayan soccer games in full and without fear. Leaders of the junta have been jailed for the crimes committed during their years in power. The former tyrants tremble.



4. Which Side Are You On?

In Oxford and other British university cities, an unusual set of graffiti appeared above pairs of Barclays Bank cash dispensers in 1984. Above one ATM was spray-painted the word Blacks. Above the other: Whites Only. The graffiti changed nothing, of course, in terms of who could use which cash machine. Customers were free to whichever ATM they preferred. Black customers could line up at the Whites Only machine if they wished to. Whites could take cash from the Blacks machine. The black-and-white labeling left people faintly unsettled, however. And unsettled was all that was needed. The graffiti made many of those lining up at the black-vs.-white machines feel uncomfortable about Barclays’ well-publicized involvement in the South African system of apartheid, where signs proclaiming Net Blankes—Whites Only—were at that time the order of the day. Fewer graduates applied to work at Barclays, so as not to be tainted by the black-white division that the bank seemed to represent. Barclays’ once lucrative share of UK student accounts plummeted from 27 percent to 15 percent of the market. In 1986, the banking giant admitted defeat at the hands of the graffiti sprayers and their allies. The Barclays pullout became one of the most high-profile and punishing acts of divestment suffered by the South African regime.

Nelson Mandela, imprisoned for life because of his rejection of the government’s racist policies, was released after twenty-seven years in 1990. Democratic elections were held in 1994. The Barclays graffiti were scrubbed away. Barclays returned to South Africa in 2005.

*******

Anonymous said...

LOL... @ reverse-psychology label. The three wise men pictured above must be really wondering about the bigger softies in Fiji who love to blog, blog-brawl and talk like there's no tomorrow.

The former British PM Thatcher was right all along. May her soul rest in peace.

Just Saying said...

I think the two Samoans don't look comfortable at all, perphaps they're along with McDummy when they not so convinced about the position he's the Forum Group to take.

GAY Ones said...

HMMMMMMMMMMMM @6pm
the problem with what Margaret said is that in fiji we are run by a bunch of men who dont know whether they are men or women... AG CJ PM President...
LOL

Anonymous said...

the Forum group turned out to be a "F" group after all.

Anonymous said...

Long Live Dharam Lingam!
Thought he had departed and gone to meet up with the 72 virgins in that special place in the sky reserved for special suckers like him.
But cometh some fresh manure (in the form of the "F"gang) then cometh out our man the shithead Dharam Lingam.
Long live DL!

Anonymous said...

you have the Laughing Samoans who make samoans proud around the world.And then you have the Laughable Samoans in the "F" group who put Samoans to shame everywhere.

Anonymous said...

It's disappointing that the CMD statement didn't deplore recent developments, remind the regime of past commitments, or flat out reject the regime's process as unacceptable to the international community, but don't read too much into the CMG statement. This is diplomaticspeak, so of course it's watered down until it's as bland and unoffensive as possible, emphasizing areas of agreement and avoiding all controversy as much as possible. During their personal meetings with the regime and its critics, these ministers undoubtedly remained somehwat guarded and politick, but you can bet that the gloves came off and that the regime needed to field some tough questions.

The real question is how will the group report this to the PIF and what, if any, recommendations for action will come of it. The PIF followed Canberra's former approach by instituting various half-measures and issuing threats culminating in Fiji's suspension from the Forum. It's followed Canberra's more recent tack by pretending to go along with the regime and giving it the benefit of the doubt. Neither of those approaches has done anything but given Bainimarama more time to entrench. All they've done is prolonged the agony, driven Fiji closer to Beijing, weakened the PIF, and embarrassed Canberra.

Time for the PIF to try the third and final alternate approach, which is to lay some serious markers about expectations to be met, especially vis-à-vis the elections, and to lay the groundwork for invoking Biketawa and taking firmer measures if those conditions are not met.

Anonymous said...


the head of this soft cock congregation Mc Cully has maintained his reputation as a man not worthy of honour

Anonymous said...


I know this is an anti regime blog so majority of the comments are such. But what have we achieved for the past 6 years. Nothing. I mean nothing. Rajend can blog from Syd, rajesh can throw tatti from NZ but he hands gets dirty. Rokolui made noise but it was full of hot air, driti showed his muscle but became a pussy soon after. Do we need a change in strategy? Yes we do. I wish dakuwaqa was around. My view is that if we don't have the balls like what's happened in Middle east, we should just join the regime and change it from inside. Offcourse some you will bash me. I challenge you to get off your backside and do something than throw a tantrum.

Anonymous said...

The statement could've been stronger but the Forum is obviously continuing it's softly softly approach. Behind the scenes they may well have given the Suva regime the bollocking it deserves.

Anonymous said...

Unfair to blame the two Samoan gentleman. It's my feeling they would be following the lead of Murray McCully and Australia.

Let's hope McCully's plan works come 2014 when all will be revealed at which time it will be fair to castigate him and drag through the streets of Suva.

Anonymous said...

FRANK WANT PAST POLITICIAN TO TALK TO HIM .
IF YOU WANT IMMUNITY FRANK THAN GIVE IMMUNITY TO ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS.
START FROM CRW/SPEIGHT /QARANIVALU /PM LQ/MPC/MERE SAMISONI/VRF PEOPLE AND OTHERS.THATS FAIR.ALL GET IMMUNITY.
FORM A GOVT OF NATIONAL UNITY WITH ELECTED MP THAN BRING BACK THE 1997 CONSTITUTION.
ESTABLISH THE TRUTH /JUSTICE/MERCY COMMISSION.
MILITARY AND POLICE SWEAR OATH TO THE GOVT OF THE PEOPLE .NO MORE COUP FROM NOW ON .MAKE IT CLEAR IN THE LAW ANY FUTURE COUP MAKERS WILL BE HANGED TO DEATH.NO MORE IMMUNITY.
GET BACK THE GCC AND LET THEM APPOINT PRESIDENT AND VP ON MERIT.
NEW CJ AND JUDGES/MAGISTRATES.
NEW POLICE COMM/ARMY COMMANDER/COMM OF PRISON.OVERSEA PEOPLE APPOINTED BY UN.
PUBLISH ALL GOVT DEBT/MINISTERS SALARIES/GOVT TENDERS AWARDED COMPANY NAME.AG REPORTS FROM 2006-2012.
THIS WILL BE A GOOD START TO HAVE FREE/FAIR ELECTION IN 2014 UNDER LEGAL 1997 CONSTITUTION.AND OBSERVERS FROM UN/FORUM /EU/CW TO OVERSEE THE ELECTION 2014.
WELL THE CHOICE IS YOUR AND OTHERS.
GOD BLESS FIJI.
RAJESH.

Anonymous said...

all the people blogging from where ever you are blogging keep on blogging because you are using the power of the pen to expose the bullshit of the Fiji military regime. and that is a whole lot more then the rubbish we been getting from the so called international custodians of democracy. they are the ones who set up all those fancy standards regarding democratic rule for countries to follow. when Fiji failed to do that,when this regime failed to do that what do these high powered international and regional bodies do? Next to nothing! What they have done has amounted to nothing because the undemocratic regime - the dictatorship - has carried on comfortably for 6 years and is now poised to further strengthen its illegal and arbitrary hold on power.
They are the ones to be condemned, not the bloggers.The bloggers especially the ones outside Fiji can keep silent and not make a sound about all the undemocratic things the regime is doing and just live their lives in a relaxed way in their "greener pastures". they choose not to. they should be appreciated for making that choice to speak out. they are the voice of opposition for the people back home who's voice has been suppressed by the dictatorship.
this voice is invaluable to the pro-democracy cause.

rajend naidu said...

editor,
Speaking "on behalf of the teachers, students, police officers and Satya's shop" Allen Lockington wants to know "Why was the tar seal removed?" from the stretch of road in front of the police post in Mulomulo.
He appeals for the road to be "resealed" (Fiji Times 14/4).
I applaud Allen's community-public spirit.
Speaking on behalf of the many law abiding citizens of Fiji who today are unable to speak out themselves I ask why was the democratic government of Fiji removed and replaced with a military dictatorship that is causing harm to the good name of the Fiji military, the country and its people? Didn't we learn anything from our previous 3 coups and how they in a very real way graveled our tar sealed road to democracy?
Our road to democracy before the coups, including the current one, had potholes. All we had to do was to fix the potholes.
Please restore democracy in Fiji now because that is what the people of Fiji want.
They don't want to live under a military dictatorship.
Any one who says he prefers to do that is either a liar or an intellectual imbecile if not a military lackey or thug.
sincerely,
rajend naidu
sydney

Anonymous said...

Question: Will McCully and co take responsibility in 2014 or say as he has already said something to the ilk: We always knew it would be a long road

Freddy said...

Everybody waiting for outcome socalled democratic elections of 2014 except the people. They can already see the writing on the wall - the same writing on the same wall 7 years ago.

Anonymous said...

A few international journalist with a negative slant will not make a dent. Our own people in NZ and Aust will not make a dent with a few marches here and there.

As long as we have Chor leaders like MPC people will have second thoughts about supporting United Front.

Anonymous said...

@ 9.32 GAY Ones

Indeed, it's just a very sordid political culture that we currently have in Fiji, led and perverted by those who ought to know better. And I'm not talking about GAYS in general but specifically the perverted shysters propping up and advising their dictatorship. What a disgraceful lot!

Anonymous said...

To Anon 7.32: It's actually ok to blame the two Samoans. You said the two following NZ/Australia. That's the whole problem - Pacific leaders only know how to follow, not how to lead. They are fat and lazy and leave the hard decisions to the bigger powers. Pacific leaders are nothing on the international stage - they never had the balls to stand up to Aus/NZ.

Anonymous said...

The nub of the argument is that "Bainimarama imposed requirements on political and civil society that ensured they would fall short and that left the drafting of the constitution entirely in the government’s hands." In other words, the regime set the process up for failure. It tried to set it up for failure all along, but got worried when Ghai began to take the farce seriously. And so it repeatedly added new hurdles to the political registration process. Not too unlike what the regime did earlier with the re-registration of lawyers as a way to intimidate and disallow those perceived as political opponents.

Anonymous said...

I've been busting Rajen Naidu's chops on some issues lately, but his statement at 10:38 AM is spot on.

"All we had to do was fix the potholes". That's it in a nutshell.

Well done!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 6:36, I share your frustration, but were Dakuwaqa still around, do you think he'd endorse your proposal to join with the regime to try to change it from inside? I certainly don't.

This regime has had ample opportunities to broaden itself and to bring in competent civilian leadership. The reason why those opportunities never panned out was because the regime was never genuinely interested in dispersing and sharing, much less returning, power; it's only interest has been in accumulating and concentrating power.

Believe it or not, numerous "do-gooders" joined the regime with the motive of trying to change and improve it from the inside. They've had poor recompense for their efforts. It simply didn't work, and they embarrassed themselves in the process.

Dakuwaqa was never about aiding or abetting treason. In fact, he gave Bainimarama a date for amnesty, and that date has passed.

The natural inference I draw is that Dakuwaqa believes the time has come for Bainimarama to answer fully for his crimes.

Now, the question I have is how do you think Dakuwaqa would have organised us to achieve that important goal? I think the answer is in the Small Acts of Resistance approach shared by another poster before.

Write us at Dakuwaqa2609@gmail.com or Dakuwaqa@hushmail.com to share your own thoughts and to join the gathering forces of Fiji's democratic resistance.

Anonymous said...

"Give peace a chance" -- that's right, isn't it?

But haven't we been giving peace a chance for nearly seven years now? Seven is a Biblical number. That's a time, with years sometimes represented by days.

Peace has been given its chance. It just hasn't worked.

If we do the same things we've always done, we'll get the same results we've always gotten.

Time for the PIF and time for us to try a different strategy.

Anonymous said...

Anon @5.19pm There is nothing embarassing about trying to do good for your country and failed because the dictator and the pig saw u as a threat to their agenda. its people like u and dakuwaqa who do nothing but pretend to be wise academics and just talk and give advice, sometimes well off the mark, that should be ashamed of your selves. so the deadline has passed, what are u doing about it huh???

Anonymous said...

anon 5.19pm u criticise and live in past crap of dakusona but offer nothing

MSG said...

notice that there are no mellanesians in this group.'the curly hairs support franky 100% not for what he is doing but simply because hes melanesian. One day they will be saying kick the kaiindia out of fiji. just watch

Coup fourpointfive said...

MSG@9.56am Delegation included Edward Natapei from Vanuatu.

Anonymous said...

@ Anon 5.19PM

That other poster is me. Just a few thoughts... yes, the answer has always been in non-violent acts of resistance (whether we are in a democracy, a free society or not). It only becomes more significant and pressing when living in a dictatorship and ruled by a despot, because of the nature of the animal that we're dealing with.


No matter how insignificant they may look to our well-armed oppressors, these small, creative acts of non-violent resistance when persistently pursued, they collectively have a bigger impact on the numbed senses of the silent majority. It's a proven tactic in many countries around the world.


It's important though to maintain treading the higher ground when we're creatively thinking about these non-violent acts of resistance - which must be contextualised (very important if we are to secure the desired effect and outcome).

Anonymous said...

@ MSG

I am an itaukei with lots of curly black hair, but just they try to kick out the ethnic Indians from Fiji, that'll be the day!


If we can't live alongside each other (and this goes to those other intolerants whether they be indians or whatever ethnicity they belong to), if we can't learn to iron out our differences and live peacefully alongside each other in the country we're all born in - then who can we live with?? No one!


I certainly wouldn't want to live with my own people if they choose to chase non-itaukeis out. Talk about cutting off your nose to spite your face! And that for me is the most important consideration..


The other consideration some may wish to look at is: those very Melanesian countries resort to inter-tribal conflicts all the time and commit all kinds of acts of violence and oppression against each other esp. the weak and vulnerable - even though they are all indigenous themselves. My gosh...

So, is something's missing?

You bet there is! And that's your job to go figure out!

Life is not meant to be handed over to you on a silver platter. :)

MSG said...

anon at 11.32am hope ur grand children will understand ur explanation why they have to pay rent to the government for land that u already own. dont be a naive pretend to be christian love thy neighbour hypocrite. cos i bet u when kaiyum tables a law to allow the government to move ur village land away for whatever reason u wil be one of the first like the many that went to parliament when george with the help of frank to kill the kaiindia. the trouble with fiji is not race. its the lack of trust between kaiviti and the kaiindia. u cant trust each other to look after each other. just open ur eyes to what is happening. when the kaiviti had power the kaiindia all complain. now the kaiindia has power and kick ur chiefs and ur church and change the land laws u all complain.

Anonymous said...

Do you think BM cares what these delegations thinks ...they need BM ...BM doesnt need them..

Anonymous said...

wasn't Edward Natapee a PM of Vanuatu once? why did the people of vanuatu decide he should not be PM anymore?
He was not removed in a Fiji style "clean up" coup,was he?

Anonymous said...

Not so fast @ MSG.

I was present in Suva, in May 2000 but it never once occurred in my mind to be part of those thugs that rushed to Parliament in the height of the takeover and hostage crisis, because I saw the problem for what it was - a lack of INTEGRITY and HONESTY in our leaders across the divide (generally speaking here since there were a few good ones) that led to the breakdown in TRUST and subsequent impasse between groups of people who led the nation on important matters such as LAND and LAND USE.


Access to resources has always been pivotal in the crisis you see erupting in nations across the world - Fiji is no different.


Problem we currently have in Fiji is a group of THIEVING THUGS pretending to have the nation's interests at heart but in reality are no different and arguably even worse than their predecessors, in helping themselves WILFULLY to the glowing fiscal benefits that comes with holding on to POWER!!!

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 9:44 and 9:52, please learn to read. You say these guys like Dakuwaqa and this other poster at Anon 5:19 are academics, but what do you base that on? Just because they're articulate, they must be academics?

You say that all they do is to offer advice, but if you read Anon 5:19 again, he's asking everyone else for THEIR thoughts.

You say there's nothing embarassing about trying to do good for your country and failing "because the dictator and the pig saw u as a threat to their agenda". But indeed those who did join with the regime ARE embarrassed and deservedly so for being so foolish and naive and even treasonous.

Dakuwaqa's amnesty deadline has passed, and now what are WE doing? Answer: Organising resistance.

You embarrassed yourself by joining the regime, and now what are YOU doing? Answer: Trying to justify your past support for the illegal dictator and to stay the hand of those who would defend Fiji against him.

MSG said...

just read the BOI statements mate then u mite see the real fiji and not through rose coloured glasses. no one talking about kicking kaiindia out. its about trust like u said. lessons of 2000 not learnt. its happening again, land and resources they touching on them now. when u kaiviti gonna trust kaiindia to not touch your land? when u kaiviti gonna trust kaiindia enough to give them political power?

Anonymous said...

Its time to rise up ... the international community will sit and do nothing ... interventionist policy by international community has not worked and are been shelved for good ... The people has to stick by their faith and inner strength and demand a change and self removal of the self elected government ...

Anonymous said...


who says Fiji has gone backward since the takeover? Under the Bainimarama regime Fiji has started to produce Bollyhood films and blue movies!!

Anonymous said...

soft cock is the best was to describe murray.

big talker from northland when playing rugby


now john keys bitch!! he has done nothing for nz so do not get your hopes up for fiji or any other pacific island

he is a deep done conservative racist who cannot give ashit about the maori or any stupid islanders

fiji people stick up for yourselves

Anonymous said...

Time for an organised BOYCOTT of elections. As the regime is so desperate to have elections to legitimise themselves, it is time for the opposition to step back and deprive them of this legitimacy. The fact is the regime will accpet no outcome that doesn't offer them continued power. There have be coalitions before and look who got burnt. BOYCOTT and expalin to anyone who will listen, why.

Anonymous said...

A team from Papua New Guinea will visit Fiji soon to start recruiting workers for positions in their country (Fiji Times 17 April).
Papua New Guinea has a population of 7,013,829 and Fiji has a population of 868,403 (source :World Bank 2011). Fiji has had 4 coups which forced many skilled workers to flee the country. Papua New Guinea has had none.
Papua New Guinea has far greater natural resources and mineral wealth then Fiji. And yet a team from PNG has to come to Fiji to recruit workers! Goes to show how backward that country is.What does that tell us about the quality of leadership in that country since its independence in 1975?

Anonymous said...

the forum soft cocks came and gave us a false fuck and then took off.

Anonymous said...

Corrupt ... bought licience for 150Kina ... promised advanced liience with another 150 in 3 months ...

Anonymous said...

We need to start shooting these bastards ASAP? Especially Bainimarama,Epeli Nailatinisona,
Khaiyum,Aziz,Gate,Tikoitoga? Let's just cut the bullshit and start
giving out the weapons-now!!!!
That's right,i said shoot these bastards anyone of these bastard
must be shoot? I think your first
mark should be Bai or Khaiyum and than Gate and it better be in that order?