#header-inner img {margin: 0 auto !important; #header-inner {text-align: Center ;} Fiji Coupfourpointfive: How Frank Bainimarama benefited from the 2006 military coup revealed

Friday, February 19, 2021

How Frank Bainimarama benefited from the 2006 military coup revealed

Last week in Parliament, while pushing through a Bill to establish the Anti-Corruption Court, Frank Bainimarama's right-hand man Aiyaz Sayed Khaiyum, who is prepared to die a thousand times for his boss, lamented that corruption was rife in the country. And here we thought the 2006 military coup was a clean-up campaign as claimed by coup leader Bainimarama.

Back in 2006, he also said that nobody in the military's interim regime would benefit from the coup and those serving the regime would not be allowed to contest any elections.

Yeah Right!

Starting with Bainimarama and Khaiyum, most of them contested the 2014 elections. Another major player who was the first finance minister, Mahendra Chaudhry, was barred for 8 years after being convicted for an offence. Now he too is busy laying the ground to fight in 2022 when he will be 80 years old.

It didn't stop there. Bainimarama himself had a financial windfall under the guise of holding multiple ministerial portfolios.

Remember Bainimarama proclaimed loud and clear that he was only going to be paid the salary of the Commander of Republic of Fiji Military Forces and not for holding the position of Prime Minister in the regime!


Well, that changed in January 2010. He got the Commander's salary increased from $96,0000 to $230,000 and obtained other benefits, increasing his total salary package to over $316,000 per year.

A letter from sources close to Government House and Ratu Epeli Nailatikau, who was President in 2010, shows how Aiyaz Khaiyum , who was then Attorney General, wrote to Nailatikau and got the package approved for his boss.

Apart from other benefits including full medical treatment for him and his family, from January 2010 until the elections in September 2014, Bainimarama’s earnings are as follows:


Base salary: $230,000 per annum

Extra Duty Allowance: 12.5% of base salary which is $28,750 per annum

25% Gratuity for every 12 months of service: $57,500 per annum


Total salary per annum: $316,250

This was his salary for 2010,2011,2012, 2013 and until 3rd October 2014 when it was increased through the parliamentary remunerations decree to $328,750.

This isn't corruption in Bainimarama and Khaiyum's dictionary.

No wonder Nailatikau, who has always lived off state resources, is back earning a fat salary of $150,000 per year as Speaker, for approving the other fat cat Bainimarama’s salary.

And no wonder his salary was never listed in the Civil Service List published every year containing ranks, names and salaries of all civil servants.


Read the letter for yourself.



12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you Coupfourpointfive for your revelations of the corrupt wealth amassment by " clean up " coup leader Bainimarama and his political sidekicks and cronies. That's one thing that has certainly flourished in post coup Fiji. The corrupt wealth of the rogue rulers of the country and their lackeys. Cry the beloved country for falling into the hands of armed robbers and thieves.

Suomynona said...

Its been coming eventually where everything wrong with those two sons of bitches would be exposed continuously as most people have always known about FFP cronyism and nepotism.

This isn't new anyways, and we'll most likely end up like Venezuela, Cuba, Myanmar, and Zimbabwe the longer those two morons remain in power. And they even plan to extend it further by doing away democratic fundamental which makes the authoritarian control more apparent and very dangerous.

This is why the backwards mentality is rife within the mindsets of several people, especially in parliament.

Frankie may be Khaiyum's "boss," but everyone knows Khaiyum is the ventriloquist who has his hand shoved so far up Frankie's ass because the high school dropout can't bloody think for himself except his own money and nepotistic family.

Anonymous said...

Editor,
ROGUE MILITARY MOB
If you think the rogue elements of the Fijian military who dismantled our democratic system of governance - a colonial inheritance - were bad for the country, you are right. They have indeed been very bad for our democracy. But they are still second rate, even small fry, when compared to the rogue military of Myanmar . They symbolise all that is rotten about the military imposing its rule over a country : the rampant corruption, the reign of terror, the political repression, the violent suppression of peaceful protest, the denial of citizens civil rights and human rights.
Rajend Naidu

Anonymous said...

Editor,
Rule of Law
In Australia's democracy the police chief wrote a letter to the PM to clarify to him that not reporting a crime in a timely manner could jeopardise proper police investigation and even pervert the administration of justice. This in light of the revelation that a Liberal party staffer Brittany Higgins has alleged she was raped in a minister's parliamentary office by a senior party adviser but the matter was not reported to police.
In some democracy the police chief dare not write such a letter to the PM if he wants to keep his job.
This is the beauty of Australia's democracy . People in power are held to account through separation of powers and relevant checks on the exercise of official powers.
Rajend Naidu
Sydney

Anonymous said...

Editor,
Independent investigation into USP saga
I agree with the director of Fiji Human Rights Commission Ashwin Raj's call for an independent investigation into all issues arsing from the USP saga, including complaints against university vice chancellor Prof Ahluwalia ( The Fiji Times 25/2 ).
I just hope Ashwin Raj is not part of any such independent investigation. There is a public perception that he is not an independent person. That he in fact is a yes man of the mob in power in Fiji.
Rajend Naidu
Sydney

Anonymous said...

Editor,
To Have Or Not To Have The Beard That Is The Question.
That is the question asked by Ben Padarath regarding students in our high schools ( see write up in Fijileaks ). And that has even woken Ashwin Raj, the puppet director of the Fiji Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Commission, from his slumber ( " comatose ", according to Fijileaks ). And, not unpredictably the Minister for Education Rosy Akbar claims Padarath is being a religious bigot for raising the issue of the head boy of a Muslim High being allowed to keep a full beard when other students are not.
Padarath has a legitimate question. It's Rosy and Raj who have given the issue a political twist.
When I was in high school in Fiji students would get sent home if the hair on their head or face was deemed to be too much by a teacher/ principal. I got sent home in form 6 when I was preparing for UE.
So when has the rules changed? Or, has it been changed selectively? Is there double standard in the operation of the rules?
Ben Padarath is perfectly justified in asking that question.
Rajend Naidu
Sydney

Anonymous said...

Editor,
Having The Right Moral Compass
Myanmar's UN envoy Kyaw Moe Tun said in his address to the UN that the military coup that overthrew the elected civilian government must be opposed by all means ( SBS news 27/2 ). He had the courage to speak truth to power.
Many of our high profile mob failed to do that when we had a military coup in 2006. Instead they threw their support behind the coup. Many have since then withdrawn their support when they realised the coup makers had done the coup for their own benefit and not for the country and the people. But some shamelessly continue to support a corrupt post coup regime in Fiji.
Rajend Naidu
Sydney

Anonymous said...

Editor,
People In High Places Doing The Low
French court has sentenced former president Sarkozy to 3 years for corruption. It is not uncommon to have people in high places doing the low. We in a small Pacific island country of less than one million people have a fair bit of that. Some say these days it's more than a fair bit. Some have enriched themselves so much after the coups they themselves can't believe their luck!
Rajend Naidu
Sydney

Anonymous said...

Ex-President Sarkozy's corruption particulars relate to bribing a judge and influence peddling. Now under the French system of democracy, accountability and rule of law the former president had his day in court and was found guilty. In some other places people in power do that very same thing and get away with it scotfree.
Chiku, really Rajend Naidu

Anonymous said...

Editor,
WE DESERVE BETTER
This is what an Australian citizen ( Peter Barry ) wrote and the press in Australia published ( The Age 4/3/21 ) :
" It seems our Prime Minister has become so used to bluffing his way by planting his feet, aggressively denying and lying so often that he seems to have felt that this proven ruse would work in all circumstances. With nodding colleagues, an army of spin doctors and a largely compliant press, he has got away with it for 18 months ... Until the last few days. He now presents as weak, cornered, indecisive and paralysed.We deserve better".
Would a letter like this ever see the light of day in the mainstream press in Fiji's " true democracy "?
We have a lot of the same phenomenon in the Fijian political scene,don't we?
Rajend Naidu
Sydney.

Anonymous said...

Editor,
INCOMPETENT and CORRUPT GOVERNMENT
Scott Ramsay writes " The incompetent and corrupt Morrision government has squibbed on the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry, so the 148 recommendations made by the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety have a Buckley's chance of being implemented" ( The Saturday Paper 6/3/21 ).
Now if an advanced First World democracy like Australia can have an " incompetent and corrupt " government, imagine what one could have in a " clean up " coup country where the coup had nothing to do with any clean up?
So just what was the coup about?
That question remains as relevant today in 2021 as it was in 2006.
Rajend Naidu
Sydney.

Anonymous said...

Editor,
STENCH SURROUNDING GOVERNMENT
A letter writer informs us that " There's a stench surrounding the Morrison government " ( The Age 8/3/21 ). Wonder if there is a stench surrounding the Bainimarama government?
What is the sense of civil society groups, human rights advocates, opposition political party leaders and last but certainly not the least, the ordinary people of Fiji about this?
Rajend Naidu
Sydney